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We know how stressful interviews can be. We have gathered the most asked interview questions from our own experiences as well as across the interwebs. Chances are, you will be asked at least one of them! Read on for some constructive advice on answering them..

  • Tell me about yourself.
    Keep the answer job or skill related.
  • Tell me about your dream job.
    Don’t mention a specific job. Say something generic like, “I want a job where I love the work and the people I work with.”
  • Why did you leave your last job?
    Never refer to a major problem with management or say undesirable things about your supervisors, co-workers or the organization. Keep smiling and talk about leaving for a positive reason such as an opportunity, or a chance to do something better.
  • What is your weakness?
    Always try to give a positive answer. For example, “It takes me a long time to get ready in the morning, so I set my alarm two hours ahead of my time in for work.”
  • What are your strengths?
    Sell yourself. Say how you can be a desirable employee for the company.
  • What do you know about the type of work we do?
    Do a research about the company before going to the job interview.
  • Why should we hire you?
    This is your chance to show why working for the company is important to you and why you think you will fit in. Don’t mention other applicants for comparison.
  • Tell me about a suggestion you have made.
    This will show that you care about the company’s growth. Use an example that was accepted and successful, especially one that is related to the position.
  • Do you consider yourself successful?
    You should always answer yes. Success doesn’t necessarily have to be big ones, just mention how you have achieved goals you have set for yourself.
  • Why have you been unemployed for such a long time?
    Mention the activities you have done that would help market yourself like trainings or short courses you attended, or for example say, “I gave birth and had to take care of my baby and this experience taught me so much about patience and time management.
  • What do co-workers say about you?
    Recall good things that your co-workers have said like, “My manager, Mr. Santos, once told me that I am a very organized person”.
  • How long would you expect to work for us if hired?
    Don’t give a specific answer. Say something like, “I plan on staying for long.” or “As long as we both feel I’m doing a good job.”
  • Do you think you are overqualified for this position?
    Regardless of your qualifications, state that you are very well qualified for the position. Or you may say something like, “I don’t think I am overqualified, but I am fully qualified.”
  • Have you ever had to fire anyone? How did you feel about that?
    If you had, always explain yourself in a way that implies you did not want to, but had to.
  • Are you applying for other jobs?
    Be honest. If you are considered an asset to the company, they just might give you a good salary offer to get you to work with them, instead of the other companies you are applying to.
  • Describe your management style.
    Mention how you deal with your subordinates or your projects like, “I provide team members with effective guidance and motivation to complete assignments on time so our projects succeed.” Or you can simply say “For me, good communication among members is the best way.”
  • Are you a team player?
    The answer should always be a yes then cite examples. You may mention situations where you were part of a group or organization, and the activities you’ve had that show you worked well with them.
  • What is your philosophy towards work?
    Don’t give a monologue here. Say something short and positive like, “My philosophy is to do my best at all times.”
  • What position do you prefer on a team working on a project?
    You may say you are comfortable with any position in the team, may it be the leader, or follower. This shows that you can lead a team but at the same time also able to follow directions. This shows you are flexible.
  • Have you ever been asked to leave a position?
    If you have, be honest and never say anything negative about your former boss or company. Focus on saying positive like how much you have grown from the experience.
  • What irritates you about co-workers?
    Do not speak badly of your past co-workers, as this reflects a flaw on your attitude, not theirs. Divert the negativity posed by the question. Assure the interviewer you get along well with fellow co-workers.
  • Why do you think you would do well at this job?
    Mention your skills, experience and interest.
  • What is more important to you: the money or the work?
    You can say something like, “Both are important because everybody needs money to live but job satisfaction is also important.”
  • What has been your biggest professional disappointment?
    Mention something that was beyond your control but show acceptance and no negative feelings.
  • What would your previous supervisor say your strongest point is?
    There are many good qualities you can mention but be sure to give an example or a situation to back your answer. Or if you have a recommendation letter you may say, “I believe my supervisor would say that my strongest point is that I’m reliable, hard-working, efficient, timely, and responsible. I know this because he has written it in my letter of recommendation. Would you like to see it?”
  • Tell me about a problem you had with a supervisor.
    Never mention a problem or anything negative about your supervisor. Try to think and then come up with none.
  • Are you willing to work overtime? Nights? Weekends?
    This is up to you. Be totally honest.
  • Tell me about your ability to work under pressure.
    You may say that you thrive under certain types of pressure. Give an example that relates to the type of position applied for.
  • How do you propose to compensate for your lack of experience?
    You may point out that you are a quick learner and hard worker. Or state experiences that may not be from work but are somewhat related like for a managerial position, you may cite experiences you had as a leader in a school project.
  • Do your skills match this job or another job more closely?
    Never give the interviewer the impression that you are more interested on other jobs.
  • Tell me about the most fun you have had on the job.
    Talk about having fun but at the same time accomplishing something like a team building you had where you gained a good relationship with your co-workers.
  • Would you be willing to relocate if required?
    Be honest. Discuss with your family before and, assuming this question should come up.
  • What motivates you to do your best on the job?
    Some examples are challenge, achievement, recognition, and integrity.
  • How would you know you were successful on this job?
    You can say something like, “When I have achieved all the goals that were set and I have given more than what is expected of me.”
  • Are you willing to put the interests of the organization ahead of your own?
    Just say yes. This is a test of your loyalty.
  • What qualities do you look for in a boss?
    Be generic and positive. Some examples are fair, competent, good motivator.
  • How do you see yourself five years from now?
    If you answer that you have not thought about it or you have no plans yet, the interviewer could conclude you have no vision and goals. Say something that is achievable but not too low as this could imply you lack initiative. It should be consistent with the objective on your resume and the skills you mentioned you have.
  • What have you learned from mistakes on the job?
    Mention mistakes you’ve had but be sure to focus more on the lessons you have learned from that mistake.
  • Do you have any blind spots?
    Don’t say something specific but just say everyone has them that’s why working as a team is very important to point out and cover each other’s blind spots. This answer diverts the question to how you are as a team player.